Creativity and Cultural Improvisation

The book that screamed, “Take me off the shelf and read me,” was Creativity and Cultural Improvisation, edited by Elizabeth Hallam and Tim Ingold.  “There is no prepared script for social and cultural life.  People work it out as the go along,” (Creativity and Cultural Improvisation).  I find these ideas very intriguing because some of the time it feels as though we go through life walking through the motions.  This book suggests that creativity can be found in social, political and religious institutions (which are all things that surround us on a daily basis).  This book is a compilation of essays that look into the application of creativity throughout history.  The essays are from various individuals so  it provides the reader with different perspectives.  Having multiple essays from various authors also means that the essays can be focused on the authors particular area of specialty.One of the other reasons this book was intriguing to me is because of my involvement in dance.  Having choreographed in the past I have learned a lot about finding inspirations for movement and creativity.  In my dance composition class we would use improvisation for inspiration when choreographing.  It is a way to clear the brain and let the music or a specific idea take over your body.  It is interesting to see the different ideas that for where creativity comes from.

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One Response

  1. Great hook!

    Your post reminds me of why we want to build a new program in the school of management around markets, creativity, and design. Especially useful would be books like this that poke holes in some of the myths of rational systems attempts to tightly manage creative processes or innovation.

    Ann Swidler wrote a classic article called “Culture in Action” which argues that culture is like a tool kit. It may be a useful resource for you in this class. The JSTOR link should work from a BU machine.

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