The Journalists’ Fight Against Blogs

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When researching blogging I ran across the book  Say Everything by Scott Rosenberg.  I did not have time to read the entire book, but I did come across a excerpt from chapter 9, “Journalists vs. Bloggers,” on the books web page.  This chapter focuses on beliefs from journalists that blogging is nothing more than simple amusement that should not be taken too seriously.  This offended many bloggers who started blogging in response to disagreements with the media and other published documents. 

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Socialnomics: The Social Media Revolution

I recently read portions of a book called Socialnomics by Erik Qualman. In this book, Qualman discusses how social media has revolutionized how people interact with each other and how individuals receive and come across information in today’s world. He says that social media has become the most popular internet activity over the last three years because it helps people to avoid what he calls “information indigestion”. This is the idea that people can avoid coming across and reading useless information and stories that they do not care about on the internet. Continue reading

A Revolution of Words

The article I read does not make what I would call a profound statement about blogging (profound being if someone said, “Blogging will replace books completely” — as idiotic as that may sound).  However, it was written in 2002 and appeared in Wired.  The Blogging Revolution , by Andrew Sullivan, is ahead of its time, only having been written 2 years after the idea of “Web 2.0” emerged for the first time.  I think it was a very important insight into what blogging would become and how it would affect our lives on a daily basis.  The author makes an analogy between Napster for music and blogging being the future of words and information — and I couldn’t agree more.  For I always have much more respect for someone if they make a claim that isn’t readily accepted because it is ahead of its time. Continue reading

09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0

09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0

The release of this number caused havoc.

Readers can click on a “Digg” icon on news stories, blog posts, and websites all over the internet and the stories clicked the most are featured on Digg.com.

On May 1st, 2007 Digg.com, as a result of reader votes, featured a story with the above number at the top of its homepage.  Within hours, Digg had received a cease-and-desist e-mail from lawyers.  The link to the page containing this number was consequently removed.

Yet, internet users around the world ensured that the spread of this number occurred.

“You can’t take something off the Internet.  That’s like trying to take pee out of a swimming pool.” (NewsRadio, 1990s television show)

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Technology Revised

5) Technology – New techniques, processes, products, inventions, or innovations that increase the efficiency (with respect to economics) in some area of business, society, or government that have not become widespread or a “norm” within said business, society, or government.

Words should serve a purpose.  Currently the definition of technology is something along the lines of “everything”.  People could argue that everything we use today is some form of technology, from the chairs we sit on to the cars we drive and even to the fire we use for heat.  But how does this definition of technology provide us with anything useful we can use when analyzing the world around us.  We don’t need another word for “everything”.  My definition is much more specific, useable, and relevant.

I chose not to use this concept in my responses to the other two questions because even though it would be easy to work it in, I felt that with its current definition, it does not add anything useful or offer any new or unique insight.  The word simply refers to too great a spectrum of ideas, processes, and innovations.  Would it make sense to talk about fire as a source of heat and cell phones in the same sentence?

Words should facilitate learning, understanding, and the conveyance of information.  There is a reason using a word like “stuff” is not the best way to express ideas.  For example, a research paper titles “The Study of Stuff” does not really help the reader understand what the author is talking about.  If the definition of technology is so broad, then we might as well replace the word with “stuff”.

The Revolution Will Not Be Televised…

Will it be blogged?

These are the instructions for your super special, extra, extra last post.  The stakes are high.  Success is worth a third of a letter grade on your final grade.  So, C –>C+; B+ –> A- and so on.

  1. You need to write a post that riffs, reflects, or analyzes the idea that blogging  and social media (also known as the living web, as the read write edit web, as the blogosphere, as cyberspace) are revolutionary.
  2. You will need to find a published argument by someone who makes bold, strong claims about the impact of these technologies and how they are used.
  3. You can agree or disagree.
  4. You can not use the same source publication as someone else.
  5. Published means from a print or digital source.  Digital sources must have a clear author (no wiki) and be demonstrably relevant or well-known.  For example, if it is an essay or long post form a blog, it should be a blog with some authority.  There are ways to ascertain authority.  Learning about them can be part of your learning process.
  6. Hey, a BOOK is a published form also.  (You don’t have to read a whole book, but relevant portions).
  7. You may be creative in the style or format of your post.
  8. You must post this by May 16, noon.  No exceptions.
  9. Posts must be of high quality in terms of style, mechanics, and insights.
  10. I am the final arbiter of earning credit.  No exceptions.

Historical note: “The Revolution Will not be Televised” is a classic hip-hop sung poem by Gil Scott Heron.  Yes!  It is from 1970-71. Watch!

After a long, difficult life, he is back with a new album and tour.

PS: “The revolution will be live..”

There’s a New Form in Town

The M-form (a.k.a. multi-divisional) type of corporate governance began to replace the U-form post WWI. (Scott & Davis) The old U-form, which was found in companies like railroads and large industrial firms, was becoming outdated. Thus, firms like du Pont, GM, Sears, and Standard Oil decided to create a new form. It consists of a general office HQ and several regional divisions, each of which performed different functions. The form was found to perform well in diverse markets. The M-form describes a type of organizational structure consisting of a relatively large number of relatively small units, which are controlled mainly by the setting of goals from a corporate headquarters. By the late 1970s, nearly 9 out of 10 companies utilized the M-form concept to divide the company into divisions based on the output produced. (Scott & Davis) Continue reading