The Journalists’ Fight Against Blogs

Bookmark and Share


When researching blogging I ran across the book  Say Everything by Scott Rosenberg.  I did not have time to read the entire book, but I did come across a excerpt from chapter 9, “Journalists vs. Bloggers,” on the books web page.  This chapter focuses on beliefs from journalists that blogging is nothing more than simple amusement that should not be taken too seriously.  This offended many bloggers who started blogging in response to disagreements with the media and other published documents. 

Continue reading

Advertisements

A Revolution of Words

The article I read does not make what I would call a profound statement about blogging (profound being if someone said, “Blogging will replace books completely” — as idiotic as that may sound).  However, it was written in 2002 and appeared in Wired.  The Blogging Revolution , by Andrew Sullivan, is ahead of its time, only having been written 2 years after the idea of “Web 2.0” emerged for the first time.  I think it was a very important insight into what blogging would become and how it would affect our lives on a daily basis.  The author makes an analogy between Napster for music and blogging being the future of words and information — and I couldn’t agree more.  For I always have much more respect for someone if they make a claim that isn’t readily accepted because it is ahead of its time. Continue reading

09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0

09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0

The release of this number caused havoc.

Readers can click on a “Digg” icon on news stories, blog posts, and websites all over the internet and the stories clicked the most are featured on Digg.com.

On May 1st, 2007 Digg.com, as a result of reader votes, featured a story with the above number at the top of its homepage.  Within hours, Digg had received a cease-and-desist e-mail from lawyers.  The link to the page containing this number was consequently removed.

Yet, internet users around the world ensured that the spread of this number occurred.

“You can’t take something off the Internet.  That’s like trying to take pee out of a swimming pool.” (NewsRadio, 1990s television show)

Continue reading